“un still” by Hugo Glendinning

Wednesday, 26 June 2013
7:00 pm
Bing Concert Hall

Blog Response by Rebecca Chaleff

The presentation of Hugo Glendinning’s un still is simple: a triptych of images cycle and fluctuate to the silences and swells of an accompanying score.  On the screen, we see pictures of stillness as well as motion.  We see moments that are caught by the photograph, their kinetics suspended in time, and we see moments that are sustained by the photograph, seemingly expanding beyond the temporality that frames them.  Themes of time course through un still.  There are images that have no time (a dead bird on its back, wiry feet delicately curled beneath a feathered belly), and images that are distinctly marked by time (the differences in age of a single woman, pictured over the course of 25 years, not to mention the more obvious, neon glow of the timer counting down the minutes in the background of Merce Cunningham’s Ocean).

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“Chronopolitics with Dogs and Trees in Stanford” by Tuija Kokkonen and Alan Read

Thursday, 27 June 2013
7:30 pm – 7:30 am
Roble Studio 42
Blog Response by Tuija Kokkonen

Chronopolitics with Dogs and Trees in Stanford was, on one level, an invitation to perform for a non-human. Performances for non-humans are not missed or needed by them, but can act as a place of hospitality and of impossible, yet attainable proximity emerging on the different boundaries between species and co-beings.

When a dog responds to your reading of Investigations of a Dog to it, or when an oak or an herb plant receives the “Treebeard” chapter from the Lord of the Rings or Plant Fear being read to it, what happens in that moment? What happens to humans when the witness and the respondent of the event is something other than a human being? Following Derrida’s (2008) questions: Who witnesses to what and for whom? Who proves, who looks, who observers whom and what? What is there for knowledge, of certainty, of truth, of love?

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“Power Struggle” by Olga Kisseleva, with Jean-Marie Apostolidès, Mélanie Perrier, Mandeep Gill, and Julien Toulze

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June 27, 2013
10 pm – approximately 11 pm
Building 550, Atrium
Blog Response and Photo by Tanya Augsburg

Have you ever tried to install two or more different antivirus software programs into the same computer? If so, you probably found out the hard way that many are incompatible. Have you ever wondered why? Since the threats of destroyed and stolen data are so pervasive, it would seem that there would be a great demand for antiviruses to work cooperatively—or at the very least, to not conflict with one other.

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“Too Many Conference Papers Make the Baby Go Blind: When is Neo-Futurism?” by Jon Foley Sherman, Lindsay Brandon Hunter, Chloe Johnston

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Saturday, 29 June 2013
11:15 – 12:45 am
Building 550, Studio 1

Blog Response by Sarah Bay-Cheng

It’s always an odd revelation when I chat with non-academic folks about scholarly conferences on theatre. The idea that a large part of a theatre conference would be spent with scholars of theatre reading carefully prepared papers to each other rather undramatically not only strikes non-academics as odd, but my colleagues in the sciences and social sciences are similarly puzzled. (They may rely on powerpoint, but the think it quite odd that the humanities sit and read to each other when you could just as easily read the same paper for yourself.) As I try to explain in these conversations, I’ve never found it odd. I love the opportunity to hear and share unfinished work, to test outrageous ideas seemingly off the cuff, and to perform the products of often solitary research for other people. It’s fun both reading and listening, and (at least in my case) the inevitably revising on the fly during the paper session. Indeed, when attending a conference, I’m always waiting for the unscripted, improvised moments: the casual asides, digressions, and riffs.

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“Too Many Conference Papers Make the Baby Go Blind: When is Neo-Futurism?” by Jon Foley Sherman, Lindsay Brandon Hunter, Chloe Johnston

Saturday, 29 June 2013
11:15 – 12:45 am
Building 550, Studio 1

Blog Response by Jon Foley Sherman

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By the end there was paper strewn all around our feet, the three of us staring silently, and thirty seconds left on the clock. We had given ourselves 60 minutes to deliver 11 conference papers slash plays on time and the Neo Futurists. These were assigned a number on a menu and on pieces of paper pinned to the wall behind us and the attendants called out the number of the paper they wanted next after the previous one had ended. And the night before our panel I decided to write a new one.

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Guillermo Gómez-Peña’s “Strange Democracy: Border Wars”

Friday, 28 June, 2013
7:30pm
Pigott Theater

Blog Response by David Preciado

(See also Megan Hoetger’s Blog Response here.)

Photo by Jamie Lyons

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“Radical discrimination!” yelled the woman, who resembled an Aztec warrior in an eagle headdress, fishnets, steel underwear and holding a sword. The woman came out of the theater around 7:30pm and addressed the crowd who anxiously waited for the performance outside by the stairs, much like a master of ceremonies. “Radical discrimination!” she kept yelling. The woman had power and did not hesitate reconfiguring the rules of theater. She prompted people without tickets to enter the theater first and suggested that those with tickets “fight” for their seats. “Radical discrimination” she called it, and those with tickets, those who spent money to view the performance were not guaranteed a space within the theater and those who did not purchase a ticket, either because of financial constraints or because the show sold out or because they left it to the last minute or some other reason, were granted access first.

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Performing the PSi Conference: A “Complete” Twitter Archive

Using the online platform, Storify, we have attempted to document as much of the Twitter feed as possible. However, limitations have led to several unintentional omissions of material, producing gaps and lacunae. Simultaneously, though, the Twitter Archive captured various strands and threads of live discourse, most notably in the form of “re-tweets.” However, Storify has a maximum limit to how many items may be included in any single “story.” Therefore, in order to produced a “complete” archive of Twitter activity during the conference, we have omitted re-tweets to try to collect as much original material from the Twitter feed as possible. The final, “complete” Twitter archive can be found here.

Prior posts of the Twitter Archive can be found at Post 3Post 2 and Post 1.

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“Exchange” by Raegan Truax

Saturday, 29 June 2013
Time(s) Observed: 10:20 am – 11:30 am
(durational performance from 8:30 am – 6:44 pm)
Department of Art and Art History Lobby

Blog Response by Rebecca Ormiston

Photo by Jamie Lyons

You took a risk and decided to breathe with me, and so I feel that I must write to you.

Do not consider this as an open letter to the artist. Instead, I urge you to read this as my fumble for words after our exchange.

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