“Corpulent Temporalities” by Miranda Olzman

Friday, 28 June 2013
10:00 – 11:00 pm (time observed)
Roble Studio 25 (Performance Gallery)

Blog Response by Dr. W.C. Meier

Experiencing Miranda Olzman’s Corpulent Temporalities as an audience member I knew, having read her bio, that she was performing an extension of Halberstam’s queer temporalities and social constructions surrounding fatness using tactile modalities. Walking into the gymnasium, I first laid eyes on her sitting on a tarp quietly chatting with the people who intently approached her surrounded by gauze covered in Plaster of Paris, bins of water, paint brushes, glitter sticks, markers and other various art supplies. The space looks both fun and inviting. As one of the artists who makes up the Performance Gallery, Olzman posed in the space (I saw her both standing and sitting crossed-legged) and invited transient audience members to stop and contribute to the casting of her body.

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“Paperwork: The Department of Dreams, Hopes and Fears” by L.M. Bogad

Friday, 28 June 2013
10:00 – 11:45 pm (observed intermittently)
Roble Studio 25 (Performance Gallery)

Blog Response by Dr. W.C. Meier

Photo by Jamie Lyons9209924679_738ed1aa71_o

As soon as I happened upon The Bureaucrat sitting behind his regulation metal desk, dressed in a polyester suit, silently grimacing, gesturing intently for me to sit, and surrounded by all of the props a busybody who works for something called The Department of Dreams, Hopes and Fears would have been issued by the unknown higher authority he comes from, I knew I was in trouble. With trepidation and unable to stifle my giggling, he turned a bright desk lamp so it shone directly onto my face as I sat down in the chair and squinting, connected with his eyes glaring back at me with glee. Watching, his finger tapped the desk impatiently three times. He was waiting for me to pick up the pen provided and write on the white paper…my fears. The Bureaucrat has three plastic signs which he uses to silently instruct an audience member brave enough to answer the call of his desk bell what to do. As I handed him my confession, he took a large feather out from a drawer of his desk and tickled my nose, quickly hiding the instrument of my olfactory torture when he was apparently satisfied with my recoil. He then carefully examined my document, highlighted one word, stamped it with the words ‘Return to Sender’ before promptly crumpling it up and handing it back with a smug grin. And with that, the Bureaucrat was indicating that he was begrudgingly ready for the next client to hand over to him their dreams, hopes and fears. And while I was only a part of this performance for a few minutes, I watched L.M. Bogad in character with absolute delight on and off for a few hours. And I swear, paperwork was never so much fun.

“100 Performances for the Hole (Redux); a mini-marathon of artistic moments” by Justin Hoover (et al)

Thursday, 27 June 2013
7:30-9:30 PM
Building 550 Atrium

Blog Response by Dr. W.C. Meier

PORT_130627_1230148(photo by Annabelle Port)

25 two-minute performances back-to-back. Staring into the space, an atrium, there is, to the left, a mic –which SOMArts Curator/MC Justin Hoover uses to intro and out-tro performers. Next to him, a monitor is turned to face the audience and performers with a digital clock, counting down from 4 minutes each time, including set-up, performance and teardown.

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