“Too Many Conference Papers Make the Baby Go Blind: When is Neo-Futurism?” by Jon Foley Sherman, Lindsay Brandon Hunter, Chloe Johnston

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Saturday, 29 June 2013
11:15 – 12:45 am
Building 550, Studio 1

Blog Response by Sarah Bay-Cheng

It’s always an odd revelation when I chat with non-academic folks about scholarly conferences on theatre. The idea that a large part of a theatre conference would be spent with scholars of theatre reading carefully prepared papers to each other rather undramatically not only strikes non-academics as odd, but my colleagues in the sciences and social sciences are similarly puzzled. (They may rely on powerpoint, but the think it quite odd that the humanities sit and read to each other when you could just as easily read the same paper for yourself.) As I try to explain in these conversations, I’ve never found it odd. I love the opportunity to hear and share unfinished work, to test outrageous ideas seemingly off the cuff, and to perform the products of often solitary research for other people. It’s fun both reading and listening, and (at least in my case) the inevitably revising on the fly during the paper session. Indeed, when attending a conference, I’m always waiting for the unscripted, improvised moments: the casual asides, digressions, and riffs.

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“Too Many Conference Papers Make the Baby Go Blind: When is Neo-Futurism?” by Jon Foley Sherman, Lindsay Brandon Hunter, Chloe Johnston

Saturday, 29 June 2013
11:15 – 12:45 am
Building 550, Studio 1

Blog Response by Jon Foley Sherman

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By the end there was paper strewn all around our feet, the three of us staring silently, and thirty seconds left on the clock. We had given ourselves 60 minutes to deliver 11 conference papers slash plays on time and the Neo Futurists. These were assigned a number on a menu and on pieces of paper pinned to the wall behind us and the attendants called out the number of the paper they wanted next after the previous one had ended. And the night before our panel I decided to write a new one.

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Performing the PSi Conference: A “Complete” Twitter Archive

Using the online platform, Storify, we have attempted to document as much of the Twitter feed as possible. However, limitations have led to several unintentional omissions of material, producing gaps and lacunae. Simultaneously, though, the Twitter Archive captured various strands and threads of live discourse, most notably in the form of “re-tweets.” However, Storify has a maximum limit to how many items may be included in any single “story.” Therefore, in order to produced a “complete” archive of Twitter activity during the conference, we have omitted re-tweets to try to collect as much original material from the Twitter feed as possible. The final, “complete” Twitter archive can be found here.

Prior posts of the Twitter Archive can be found at Post 3Post 2 and Post 1.

“Exchange” by Raegan Truax

Saturday, 29 June 2013
Time(s) Observed: 10:20 am – 11:30 am
(durational performance from 8:30 am – 6:44 pm)
Department of Art and Art History Lobby

Blog Response by Rebecca Ormiston

Photo by Jamie Lyons

You took a risk and decided to breathe with me, and so I feel that I must write to you.

Do not consider this as an open letter to the artist. Instead, I urge you to read this as my fumble for words after our exchange.

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“The Stone, Our Sundial” by Rebecca Chaleff and Rebecca Ormiston

Saturday, 29 June 2013
6:30 – 8:30 pm
Old Union Courtyard

Blog response by Bryan Schmidt

Photos by Jamie Lyons

Chaleff and Ormiston’s piece relied on, revealed, and reveled in the tensions between multiple temporal registers: the cosmic tempo of the setting sun as it moved across the Old Union courtyard, the standardized, linear time tracked precisely by the intermittent ringing of a nearby bell tower, unique bodily rhythms that became apparent in extended physical gestures and the performers’ increasing exhaustion as they repeatedly enacted them. Described, in part, as an investigation into the “dislocation from the outside world” that academics experience through their unusual work schedules (crystallized in feeling alienated from the cycle of dawn and dusk), the two-hour, intricately choreographed performance highlighted the friction between desire and discipline, nature and institution, public and private.

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“Shuttle” by Mick Douglas, Beth Weinstein, and James Oliver

Thursday, 27 June  through Sunday 30 June 2013
Ongoing: Time Observed (i.e. 6 – 9 pm; noon – 12:15 pm; Wednesday-Friday, intermittently; etc.)
Toyon Courtyard/Old Union Courtyard

Blog Response by Yasmine Jahanmir

I was naïve to think a performance entitled Shuttle would be performed in a static location. It now seems like common sense that a mobile performance piece would be in motion.

I wandered into Toyon Courtyard at about 7:20am looking for the performance and found nothing. I circled the building just in case there was a second courtyard and again found nothing. I double-checked the conference itinerary and I was indeed in the advertised location, so I gave up, got coffee, and went to a panel. As I was leaving the panel, I passed the Old Union courtyard and came upon a tent and stacked wooden boxes in the grass; one of the boxes was labeled “shuttle.” Turns out they had decided to move and had left a note which I did not see. Seizing the opportunity to be mobile with my review rather than canceling it, I asked about the performance I had missed and was immediately invited into navigating the remnants of the performance.

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“Record of the Time” by spatula and barcode

Wednesday, 26 June 2013 through Sunday, 30 June 2013
PSi 19 at Stanford
Blog Response by Kellen Hoxworth

In addition to the various multi-media archives of the conference — including this one, the “PSi19 at Stanford” Facebook page, and  the Twitter Archive — a durational, collaborative performance has taken place through the direction of spatula and barcode. Their piece, “Record of the Time,” offers a polyvocal series of temporal “snapshots” generated through random voluntary participation from conference-goers. Each registered attendee was offered a random time (mine was 0800) on a random date. Attendees were encouraged to share their thoughts, moments, activities, encounters, etc., from their assigned time with the knowledge that their text would be posted anonymously. Each post thus presents a slice of time in one individual’s experience of the conference as a whole. However, these slices, laid next to one another in a chronological progression chart an affective progression from anxiety towards exhaustion.

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