“Shuttle” by Mick Douglas, Beth Weinstein, and James Oliver

Thursday, 27 June  through Sunday 30 June 2013
Ongoing: Time Observed (i.e. 6 – 9 pm; noon – 12:15 pm; Wednesday-Friday, intermittently; etc.)
Toyon Courtyard/Old Union Courtyard

Blog Response by Yasmine Jahanmir

I was naïve to think a performance entitled Shuttle would be performed in a static location. It now seems like common sense that a mobile performance piece would be in motion.

I wandered into Toyon Courtyard at about 7:20am looking for the performance and found nothing. I circled the building just in case there was a second courtyard and again found nothing. I double-checked the conference itinerary and I was indeed in the advertised location, so I gave up, got coffee, and went to a panel. As I was leaving the panel, I passed the Old Union courtyard and came upon a tent and stacked wooden boxes in the grass; one of the boxes was labeled “shuttle.” Turns out they had decided to move and had left a note which I did not see. Seizing the opportunity to be mobile with my review rather than canceling it, I asked about the performance I had missed and was immediately invited into navigating the remnants of the performance.

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“Record of the Time” by spatula and barcode

Wednesday, 26 June 2013 through Sunday, 30 June 2013
PSi 19 at Stanford
Blog Response by Kellen Hoxworth

In addition to the various multi-media archives of the conference — including this one, the “PSi19 at Stanford” Facebook page, and  the Twitter Archive — a durational, collaborative performance has taken place through the direction of spatula and barcode. Their piece, “Record of the Time,” offers a polyvocal series of temporal “snapshots” generated through random voluntary participation from conference-goers. Each registered attendee was offered a random time (mine was 0800) on a random date. Attendees were encouraged to share their thoughts, moments, activities, encounters, etc., from their assigned time with the knowledge that their text would be posted anonymously. Each post thus presents a slice of time in one individual’s experience of the conference as a whole. However, these slices, laid next to one another in a chronological progression chart an affective progression from anxiety towards exhaustion.

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“Falling Into Place,” by Gretchen Schiller

Friday, 28 June 2013
12:00 pm
Roble 33

Blog Response by Rebecca Chaleff

Photo by Jamie Lyons9209914477_23ee68699f_o

For the past few days, Roble 33 has been a mystery to me.  I heard whispers about it: those who had volunteered to set it up expressed incredible curiosity, and those called upon to photograph the space exclaimed, “I don’t know what she’s doing in there, but it’s beautiful.”  I got several text messages telling me that I absolutey had to see it.  My interest was engaged, to say the least.  I tried desperately to find an appointment—the books were full, and only one spot remained.  I nearly sacrificed a friendship ensuring that I was the one to take this appointment.  I was lucky (and yes, we’re still friends).

I returned the next day to check in at the front desk of Roble, disguised from its usual function by a lace tablecloth and stacks of archaic-looking books and scrolls tied with ribbon.  I was checked-in, led down the hall to Roble 33, and told to stand in the threshold until instructed to do otherwise—until the “librarian” came to fetch me.  All I could see was absence.  Thick curtains sucked space and time out of the room.  I felt as though I were standing in a vacuum, a black hole in the middle of the Stanford campus.

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Performing the PSi Conference: A Processural Twitter Archive, Post 1

This blog is a catalog of responses to events. These responses occur in various temporalities, in different rhythms, and in different media. The psi19performance blog attempts to collapse the distances, distinctions, and differences between these times, patterns, and forms as well as those between the “liveness” and the documentation of the conference, between the academic, praxis, and performance valences of the conference, and between this blog’s own nature as archive and its serial eventhood, marked by its insistent up-to-datedness.

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